IN THIS WEEK’s “Faces of ITS” profile, meet Cole Snook, a National Honor Thespian senior from Troupe 2720 at Millard South High School in Omaha, Nebraska.

Cole Snook

Cole Snook

How has theatre impacted your life?
I’ve been doing theatre for a long time, having started when I was around 3 years old. I had always been an extroverted child, but I started to recede into a shell in middle school. Through my first two years of high school I stayed there. I had done some shows, but it wasn’t until the first show of my junior year that I began to embrace who I truly was. Theatre allowed me to be an honest version of myself.

What is one lesson you’ve learned from theatre?
I think the biggest thing theatre taught me was how to create. Without performance art or visual art, the world would be a drab place. Through the embodiment of a character and the sharing of a scene, I bring a new and inventive take to a world that can otherwise seem repetitive.

What has been your favorite theatre experience so far?
My favorite theatre experience so far would definitely be the show Harvey, [which occurred] the beginning of my junior year. The show had a small cast, which made for a tightknit group. The moment that truly made the show was our break in between a two-show Saturday. It was just us onstage, and we were playing Mamma Mia! over the sound system. We all started dancing, and it was one of the best days of my life.

Who is your theatre hero?
I think my theatre hero is my friend Madi Wesch. She has a perseverance unlike anyone else I’ve seen. I’m always left in awe when I see her act or direct. She has this innate ability to connect to a piece of literature with such honesty that you wouldn’t know she is acting. I find that very admirable.

What theatrical character or show best describes your life?
I think the theatrical show that best describes my life is Hairspray. I’m a big kid, always have been. But Hairspray shows that beating one form of discrimination can cause a domino effect. That’s something I feel I do every day. If I can get people to look past my size, then it won’t be long before they look past my race or my sexuality and see an actor. One equal to all.

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